Monday, 13 July 2015

#Microblog Mondays: the have-done list


On days that I feel energetic and optimistic about how much I'll get done, I often write a to-do list.

On days that I feel rather less so, for whatever reason, I like to write a "have done list."

That means I start off the day with a blank sheet (whiteboard, in my case) and as I do things I write them down. The only things on the list are the things that are already done.

It's actually a good system and helps me focus on what I do successfully and efficiently (or less efficiently) on a daily basis, instead of the big tasks that are still undone.

I recommend it. :-)

More blogs - read them, comment, then add it to your have-done list!

24 comments:

  1. I like the idea of a "have done" list. Definitely not something I would have thought out on my own. It's so easy on those less than days to focus on the seemingly miles-long to-do lists and get feeling even worse. This is a great way to shift the focus. I'm going to keep this in mind when I'm having one of those days.

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    1. Oh, I know. The endless to do lists, or the really big project that feels too intimidating to start. They can both be so discouraging! the have done list gives me just enough encouragement to do what I can.

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  2. I love this idea! How accomplished it must feel to fill up that blank whiteboard with all the things you've actually done, without any of the guilt of the things you didn't get to. :) I started writing down a couple things that I've accomplished each day of summer (I've been about 50% successful on this) to try and figure out where my time goes. I know I "have done" lots, but somehow writing it down makes it feel more substantial.

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    1. PS, more of a reply to your comment on the Coffee Break post by Mel, but I really miss taking an actual lunch at school, too! I used to be split between buildings, and the other building had a culture of PRESERVE YOUR SANITY. HAVE A SOCIAL LUNCH, and we would play euchre and have 30 minutes (or 20 depending on the day) to unwind. That doesn't exist at the school where I landed, and without someone yelling at me to TAKE YOUR LUNCH TIME, I will just work straight through. I need to start doing that again and leave the guilt behind! :)

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    2. Well, I usually still feel a bit guilty about what I didn't get to - but at least I don't focus ONLY on that. Also, it's a kind of positive feedback to myself that I am getting things done, and that's encouraging, so I'm actually likely to get more things done. I'm also the kind of person who sets out to do one tasks, notices 3 other things that need doing, starts on those, notices something else, etc. So I'm either very efficient or completely not lol.

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    3. At the school I used to work there was no consistent culture around breaks, either, although certain groups of people would get together. But I had to make up my own mind to take a real break (certainly there were people that encouraged me, so that was good.) I do have some motivation to practice healthy living in my field as I'm supposed to be teaching life skills and self-management lol. Hard to do that convincingly if I'm stressed / exhausted and thirsty/hungry. Talk is talk but the example is what counts. So I tell myself. I hope you are able to take your breaks. So much of successful teaching is just avoiding burnout. :-)

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  3. Haha I do a combination of that. We have a chalkboard on the wall in the living room with a to do list and I'll add in things I've already done just so that I can cross them off and my list looks better.

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    1. Ha, yes I do that too! Sometimes I'll write a list of things to do and then do a bunch of other things, so I have to add them or it feels like I haven't done anything!

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  4. Oh my gosh what a great idea!

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    1. :-) Try it one day; it can make such a difference! I'm also thinking that taking time to relax might be a good thing to add to the "done" list, because some days that's hard to do.

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  5. Oooh, I may try this. Because there are often days when I think, "what have I done all day?" I am a huge lover of the to do list, but I've never tried a done list.

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    1. Oh, I know. That's the problem I have with to-do lists: I spend most of my time doing things that aren't on them. Although you can do what Romy does and just add things to the to-do list that you did for the pleasure of crossing them off.

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  6. LOL, I've done the same as Romy! ;)

    When I was working, I used to keep a running list in my daytimer of what I had worked on during the day, who had called/who I had called, etc. Came in VERY handy at performance appraisal time when I had to summarize my accomplishments for the past year. The big stuff was obvious, but I did tons of little things for a lot of different people that might otherwise have gone unrecognized, if I hadn't had those notes to remind me.

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    1. so true; at work I often wonder where the time goes, too. There are so many things to do just to be able to do the things that matter.

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    1. :-) And you can start doing it anytime!

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  8. Ooo I actually like this. I never thought of doing that. Probably because I'm a freak procrastinator who needs to-do lists...

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    1. I can procrastinate too. The have done list actually helps because it reminds me I do accomplish things and it's OK to start!

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    1. yes, it is a good one especially with a little one!

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  10. I love this idea! On those days I typically just write even longer to-do-lists, and feel bad about not crossing off any of it...

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  11. Haha whenever I write a to-do list I add things I've already done, just so it's not write so daunting. It helps!

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    1. Totally. the things to do have a way of multiplying!

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